22
June 2016

A simple guide to image file formats / Get it right the first time

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As a designer I am always asking my clients for logo files, surprisingly they are often unable to supply the correct files to me, which either means the client is unable to get the work done or they have to fork out for a re-draw of the current logo and are re-supplied with the correct files. Both of those options aren’t ideal and cost the client unexpected money that shouldn’t have needed to spend in the first place. So I am hoping with the below post it will help anyone out there sourcing a designer for work to ensure they get the correct files. Here is a list of the some file extensions you may come across when working with a graphic designer, what they are and how they are used.

When I supply logo files, I send a Style Guide detailing fonts and colours used, PNG, JPEGS and the most important file of all an EPS file.

By reading the following you can then head into your new venture with the knowledge and trust you need for when you are ready to organise other business collateral.

AI: Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Illustrator File. As the industry’s leader in software for creating vector graphics, Adobe Illustrator files are commonly used in the creation of logos by graphic designers. These files can also be supplied to printers for use when printing in large format or to other designers for creation of other awesome collateral.

What is it suitable for? Stationery, Flyers, Business Cards or any other collateral that will be printed of high quality.

EPS: Encapsulated Postscript

This is the most IMPORTANT FILE, I can not stress that enough. This is an industry standard, meaning “encapsulated postscript” or otherwise known as “vector”. it can be imported into all major design programs, and is often the file of choice for printing companies and designers. Almost any kind of design software can create an EPS. It is more of a universal file type (much like the PDF) that can be used to open vector-based artwork in any design editor, not just the more common Adobe products.

What is it suitable for? Stationery, Flyers, Business Cards or any other collateral that will be printed of high quality.

PDF: Portable Document Format

PDF is a file format that has captured all the elements of a printed document as an electronic image that you can view, navigate, print, or forward to someone else. PDF files are created using Adobe Acrobat , Acrobat Capture, or similar products. To view and use the files, you need the free Acrobat Reader, which you can easily download.

JPG: Joint Photographic Experts Group

A JPG file is a compressed image file that does not support a transparent background. The level of compression in JPG files can vary in resolution with high quality for desktop printing, medium quality for web viewing and low quality for email. When compressed repeatedly the overall quality of a JPG image is reduced.

What is it suitable for? Websites, Online Advertising, Email Signatures or anything web-related.

PNG: Portable Network Graphics
The PNG file format is most commonly used for use online and on websites due to their low resolution. PNG files are bitmap images that employ lossless data compression. PNG files can be created with a transparent background.

What is it suitable for? Websites, Online Advertising, Email Signatures or anything web-related.

Have you been supplied with the correct file types from your Graphic Designer?



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